Archive for the ‘Photo Equipment’ Category

Travel And Photos: Looking At Light

Few people, including myself, have the luxury of staying in each travel destination long enough to feel that there was nothing more to shoot. To compensate for the brief time spent in any one place, your photographic eye must be constantly scanning the environment for images that offer strong compositions, good lighting and that communicate–without words–the feeling of the culture. monasteryThere are basically two categories of pictures that I focus on for each location. The first is the establishing shot. This could be the skyline of Frankfurt, the Grand Canal in Venice or a wide-angle view of the Pushkar Fair in India. These kinds of pictures quickly identify a place and provide a segue into the rest of the pictures–either in a slide show or a magazine layout. The second category is the detail photography. This could be an intimate… Read on here...

Nikon’s Image System Is The Business

Nature photographer Bill Fortney began shooting for newspapers, then moved on to sports photography, magazine photojournalism and medical photography. But it was when he discovered nature photography in the early 1980s that he became “hooked.” He’s been photographing the great outdoors and teaching nature workshops ever since. His most recent project (with his son Wesley) is a remarkable collection of natural-history landscapes of the U.S. taken from an ultra light airplane at 500 feet, just published in the book America from 500 Feet! Later, he set up Parazz.com, a blog for photographers looking to hone their skills, as well as find out about health subjects. Fortney has been using Nikon gear for more than 30 years. He says, “As a nature photographer, I’m often faced with subjects and light that are fleeting. If you can’t work fast with equipment in… Read on here...

Shooting Birds. With A Camera, Silly.

A fast lens is definitely an asset as it will allow you to shoot at a faster shutter speed and in dimmer light. It will also provide a brighter image in the viewfinder for quicker and easier focusing. Excellent lenses are available in the 300mm range with an aperture of f/4. These also work well with compatible 1.4X and 2X converters. If your budget allows, I recommend the faster f/2.8 lens. When used with the converters, this will give you an excellent combination with plenty of versatility for most photographic situations. If you are really getting serious about photographing birds, a great lens choice would be a 500mm f/4 or f/4.5. Yeah, not the best shot.Yeah, not the best shot. To get the best performance from your camera and lenses, you must use a good tripod. The trick is to purchase one that is… Read on here...